Tag Archives: copyright

Hotfile found liable for staggering amount of copyright infringement

When 89% of your top uploaders are repeat infringers – you might be liable for copyright infringement.

Crime Scene
Crime Scene by Alan Cleaver On Flickr – http://www.flickr.com/photos/alancleaver/

 

I could write about the recent Hotfile decision, or you can just read the great article over at Copyhype.  In fact, you should just read the article over at Copyhype.

Piracy stats updated

We’ve posted our updated stats on the /stats page so head on over and check that out.

Also, we’re working on releasing a lot of stats that show which sites we’ve had to remove the most from.  Thinking of doing a Top 10 for each type of infringement.  So stay tuned for that.

It’s been a great month, new clients have came on board and we’re rolling out new programs almost weekly now.

A big thanks to all our supporters, we couldn’t do it without you!

TDP

Confirmation Bias, Sensational Journalism and How Money Motivated Pirates Get A Pass

Recently, it was brought to our attention that the pro-piracy blog TorrentFreak had ran an article about a torrent site that was experiencing a Denial Of Service attack.  While that part is nothing new, the interesting part was that the majority of the article seemed to focus on Takedown Piracy’s involvement with this piracy site which then seemed to suggest that TDP was somehow involved in the whole fiasco.

First, go ahead and read the article written by Enigmax at TF:

http://torrentfreak.com/ignoring-dmca-notices-bittorrent-tracker-subjected-to-attacks-130831/

Okay, now that you’ve read that take, we’ll give you the actual story.

About a year ago we first started getting complaints about this piracy site.  The site in question is a torrent site that specializes exclusively in pro-wrestling and MMA torrents.  We had a client who had produced his own documentary and the film was being pirated via this site.  We sent them a notice to remove and they ignored the notice.  The site was also soliciting “donations” in order to fund their operation and those donations were going through US-based Paypal in clear violation of the TOS of Paypal.

So we sent Paypal the proper paperwork and Paypal cut off funding for the site.  The site responded by switching payment processors and moving to WebMoney, also US-based.  Again, we filed a notice with WebMoney and had the service cut off.  Then the site switched to Google Wallet, but this time they added a new wrinkle.  They set up a fake “web hosting” business along with fake testimonials and everything to be the “front” they used in order to process payments using Google Wallet.  This part of the story is shown in more detail on our blog  – here.

After closing down so many of their payment options, the admin of the piracy site contacted us with the following email:

From: Staff <[email protected]>
Subject: DMCA for specific file

Message Body:
Hello,

I am a member of staff at a wrestling website called XWT.

I have been reading your article and wanted to know what specific torrent files/URL's you are wanting taken down?

Thank you.

We responded:

On 5/8/2013 at 9:40 PM, “Nate Glass” <[email protected]> wrote:

Both appear to have been finally removed.

In the future, may I use this email address to request copyright
infringing torrents be removed?

Nate Glass
Owner, Takedown Piracy

Their response:

Yes, that would be fine. Can we confirm that your client will be satisfied with the result and reports will cease on our donation options?

Our response:

On 5/8/2013 at 11:54 PM, “Nate Glass” <[email protected]> wrote:

If you will remove upon notification by myself for my current and future clients, then yes.

 

Note that I included future clients, because I had a deal in the works with an independent pro-wrestling organization and wanted to make sure our deal would cover them.

The response from XWT:

Are there any current clients that you need to provide DMCA’s for?

Our response:

At this time – no.  Though we have clients about to come on board that we will need to provide DMCAs for.

Nate

And their final response at the time:

ok 🙂

Fast forward a few months, we had not had any run-ins with them until our documentary filmmaker gave us a heads up that his movie was appearing on the site again.  Upon inspection we saw that the site was back to soliciting PayPal “donations” again, this time using a fake business that charged you for “custom avatars”.  We then sent the site three takedown notices.  2 for our documentary filmmakers, and 1 for the indy organization we had just added to our client roster.  The documentary torrents were removed, but here’s the response we got to the notice for the indy group:

These torrents will NOT be removed.  I would suggest contacting the website below considering they are the source for a lot of the packs found on my website.

http://rudos.tv/

Our response:

So you know full well that this is copyrighted material of Ring of Honor and you are refusing to remove it?

His response:

Torrent files are not the actual video file, they are simply meta links. They are also being hosted within a country where torrents are legal, if you would like to bring this up with my host, that is your choice.

As i said, the majority of these meta links are downloaded from http://rudos.tv which provide full direct download links to actual video files to which they charge a membership fee in order to download them and stream them, i would suggest you contact them for actually breaking the law before threatening me.

Our response:

So we’ll play the payment processor game again.  I thought we had already went through this and you stated you would remove when we sent you a notice.  So now you are going back on your word.

Nate

His response:

You don’t care to reply to what i just said to you? Torrent files are not breaking the law within the country they are hosted. They don’t even contain copyright information within them either.

And yet you refuse to contact a website that is fully sharing copyright material and making people pay for that copyrighted work.. what a joke.

Our response:

If you think what you are doing is perfectly legal then that’s your opinion man.  Having dedicated sections using the trademarked names among everything else is pretty obvious.  You might want to research the idea of “contributory copyright infringement” or read up on the IsoHunt case.

Then there’s that whole fake “web hosting” business you were running in order to profit from the content distributed with the help of your site.  Which, by the way, I still have all the evidence of.

And now you’re taking money…AGAIN.  You want to point the finger at Rudos but you’re just as much of a profiteer as they are.  Both of you are making money off work that you didn’t do.  If you think they are bad then you must hate to look in the mirror,  because you are no different.

But don’t worry, we’re filing notices on Rudos already, you aren’t being singled out.

However, I will be sharing all this information with the attorneys for WWE and UFC.

Cheers!

Their response:

My point is, within the law of the country my website is hosted in, these torrents are legal. There is no if’s or buts about that. Let me point you to the Oink case, SceneTorrent case, FileSoup case, Richard O’Dwyer case among others. And let me point out that movie studios were backing the majority of those cases that fell through.

Collect your evidence, but i hope you have a name and address to attach to all of that.

Our response:

When you are dedicating sections to specific content producers using their trademarked names, etc., I don’t think the legality of the contents of a torrent file are your only concern.

And yes, I have the name and address you list in your WHOIS.  Unless that information is false, which seems to be a cowardly move if you really feel that you are 100% legal, what would you have to hide by giving false information?

But I’m no lawyer, I’ll just pass along all this info the attorneys for ROH, UFC, WWE etc.

I asked you to remove Colt and Nigel’s movie and a few months ago you did that because you were running out of payment processors (guess they didn’t think what you were doing was 100% legal either), you said you would remove anything I sent you a notice on in the future.  Now you are going back on your word.  Easiest thing would have been to remove the ROH stuff and be done with it.

But instead of that you want to play this game again except now you want to put yourself in the crosshairs of even more companies.  This was avoidable but you chose to make it more difficult.

Nate

Their final response:

One or two torrents i would consider removing. 100’s? I don’t think so. Do whatever needs to be done, any further contact will be ignored.

At this point we proceeded to  have their Paypal account suspended again.  It’s also important to note the last batch of email exchanges happened on August 30th, 2013.

Unbeknownst to us, but knownst to others, while this was going on XWT was experiencing a DDOS attack.  DDOS stands for Distributed Denial Of Service and it’s a way people try to bring down and cripple websites that have drawn their ire.

According to this piracy website, the attack in question had at least been going on since August 8th.

xwt2

On August 25th, five days before our exchange, the following was posted in the XWT Forum (note “X” is the username for the XWT owner):

xwt1

What appears to be  happening is one piracy site (Rudos) is pirating wrestling material and then charging users for access to the materials.  But then those materials are ending up on XWT for free.  Thus there’s no reason for anyone to pay for access to Rudos, they just wait until it shows up on XWT for free.  This makes Rudos mad and someone there has apparently been attacking XWT over this.

Even though the site’s forum itself seemed to think the rival pirates were behind the attack, that didn’t stop the site from trying to place the blame on the companies whose content the site was ripping off.

XWT told TorrentFreak that the site’s datacenter managed to trace the attacks back to companies linked with a pair of sports organizations.

Of course, TorrentFreak didn’t need any proof to substantiate that claim.  Because it’s a great headline and red meat for their cult-like readers.  Reading the comments for the article illustrates that point perfectly.  Even though the actual facts and site itself seem to contradict TorrenFreaks article, the confirmation bias of TF’s readers is in full effect.  They want to believe that somehow the MPAA is behind this so they will blindly ignore anything that might challenge that outlook.

This comment from a TF poster went unresponded to:

xwt3

Another classy TF poster:

xwt4

Not to be outdone:

xwt5

What’s even more interesting to us is the way the Rudos connection is completely glossed over by the TF crowd.  We may have our disagreements with XWT but at least we can agree on collecting money for access to pirated content being a really shady thing to do.  In fact, there USED to be a code of ethics for pirates which included a core tenant that you don’t profit off of piracy.  These days, that rule seems to be long gone.  In fact, there now appears to be absolutely nothing pirates can do that would make other pirates call them out on it.  Long gone are the ethical pirates, replaced by selfish sheep repeating whatever Kim Dotcom tells them, or whatever garbage comes out of the EFF these days.

This article by TF could have been summed up for their readers as:

Noble pirates picked on by meanie copyright holders, but it has nothing to do with other pirates.  MPAA probably involved, and the Illuminati.

Let us just state for the record.  Takedown Piracy had absolutely 0% to do with any DDOS attack on XWT.  We don’t do DDOS, we don’t approve of it and we think it’s the coward’s way out.  It’s the computer equivalent of flipping over the Scrabble board because you’re losing.  If XWT doesn’t want to respond to our notices, we’ll work through legal channels to seek remedy for our clients.  We think it is pretty shoddy journalism to not even question the story you are reporting on, to not get each side of the story, instead focusing your story on the false narrative that incites your readers (some seeming to prefer violent retribution) is a disgusting perversion of journalism.

Takedown Piracy announces release of Nemesis program

Untitled-1

New Custom Tool NEMESIS™ Analyzes Tube Sites to Discover & Remove Pirated Movies!

July 1, 2013 — CHATSWORTH, Calif. — Takedown Piracy announces the development of its new program, already delivering a blow to tube sites. The renowned anti-piracy service calls its exclusive custom tool Nemesis™. With the implementation of the Nemesis program, Takedown Piracy has now removed nearly 100,000 pirated full-length movies and scenes.

Nemesis is named after the Greek goddess heralded as an agent of divine punishment for wrongdoing or hubris. The Nemesis tool analyzes tube sites to pinpoint videos likely to be infringing on copyrights, so the Takedown Piracy team is able to verify the infringement and have the pirated content removed.

“The goddess Nemesis carried out retribution against those who committed evil deeds and received undeserved good fortune,” states Takedown Piracy owner Nate Glass. “Digital pirates are exactly that – people who profit off the work of others. Nemesis and Takedown Piracy are coming to get them, and we have already found a ton of movies, which may have otherwise gone undetected.”

Nemesis is proving to be a comprehensive tool, changing the landscape for pirate uploaders. “We’ve already seen several prolific pirate uploaders ‘retire’ or stop uploading movies altogether,” says Glass. “We’ve been able to get others kicked off the sites by showing they are repeat infringers.”

According to Glass, many of the offending accounts were being used for financial gain in addition to uploading free content. “A lot of uploaders use the stolen content as a way to promote their own businesses. We’re more than happy to dish out justice and put these guys out of business.”

In addition to the creation of Nemesis, Takedown Piracy developed custom tools the Aikido Program™ and Aikido 2.0, as well as its advanced SEO program, Search Clean™. Aikido 2.0 uses a PHP script to exploit large piracy aggregation sites. It takes sites meant to assist illegal downloads and transforms them into valuable assets in anti-piracy. True to its martial art namesake, the Aikido Program uses the strength of its opponent to its own advantage. Search Clean is responsible for eliminating infringements from even the largest search engines, like Google. The tools and programs remove hundreds of thousands of copyright infringements at an incredible speed.

Takedown Piracy actively tracks at least nine different ways content may be pirated, providing widespread coverage.  Takedown Piracy’s army of servers offer protection in the following areas: Cyberlocker sites like Rapidshare, Torrent sites, Tube sites, Auctioned or unauthorized DVD resellers, Search Engines, Image Hosts, Blogs, Forums, Social Media.

For more information about Takedown Piracy’s services, click here.

 

About Takedown Piracy:

Takedown Piracy (TDP) is an anti-piracy service started in April of 2009.  The service was founded by 15-year entertainment industry veteran Nate Glass.  TDP offers copyright holders an affordable and highly effective means to fight back against content thieves.  For less than the cost of a part-time, minimum wage worker, copyright holders can benefit from Glass’ expertise and passion for protecting copyrighted content from thieves.  To date, TDP has removed over 20 million content infringements.  Leading piracy websites are closely monitored to always provide clients with immediate service and protection.  Every month detailed reports are provided to clients with each action taken on their behalf.  A price can’t be placed on trust, but with Takedown Piracy, clients can be sure the company has their best interest in mind 100% of the time.  For more information, visit www.TakedownPiracy.com or www.Twitter.com/TakedownPiracy.

Enet Inc. US-based ISP ignoring DMCAs?

I’ve sent many DMCAs to Enet Inc, and a strange thing has happened….absolutely nothing.

This is strange because Enet appears to be a US-based webhost.  Surely, a US-based webhost wouldn’t ignore DMCAs, doing so would subject them to considerable penalties and loss of their safe harbor.

The piracy forum Mastiya.com is hosted on the IP address: 209.190.121.234

http://geoip.flagfox.net/?ip=209.190.121.234&host=www.mastiya.com

Apparently that is a eNet Inc. IP address.

Mastiya is well known piracy site, according to Google’s Transparency Report:

http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/copyright/domains/mastiya.com/

With big copyright holders like Warner, Universal and Fox all reporting Mastiya URLs to Google.  I’m sure Enet wouldn’t want to be in the crosshairs of ignoring their DMCAs too, right?

According to Enet Inc’s website, their abuse address is [email protected] (http://ee.net/abuse.php)

Yet emails sent to this address never get a response or action.

I can’t even find Enet in the US Copyright.gov’s list of Online Service Providers, another required act for those wishing to have Safe Harbor.

So as far as I can tell Enet is not in compliance with the DMCA.  If that were true then it would be open season for copyright holders to sue them.  Not registering a DMCA agent and then ignoring DMCAs won’t look good in court me thinks.

If Enet is reading this, feel free to contact me, I’m dying to know why I’ve never received a response to any DMCAs I’ve ever sent you.  I was going to email this to you but since you ignore all my other emails…well you know.

Updates from Takedown Piracy

Lots of exciting things going on at TDP!

  • We are approaching our 8 millionth copyright infringement removed.  I remember when the naysayers and doubters said we couldn’t make a difference.  I’m sure the for-profit pirates would love if their 3 million cyberlocker links were still up, but thanks to TDP – they aren’t.  The black hat SEO pirates would love it if the 2.3 million search engine results were still up, but thanks to TDP – they aren’t.  The for-profit pirates would love it if we hadn’t killed their Paypal accounts, but thanks to TDP – their ability to make money off piracy has been seriously cut off.  There is nothing nearly as satisfying as proving the naysayers wrong.  And when it comes to copyright infringement, there are 1000s and 1000s of enablers, copyright abolitionists and freeloaders who can’t wait to try and discourage anyone from ruining their free ride.  Don’t ever let the naysayers get you down, everyone who ever accomplished anything significant had naysayers telling them it couldn’t be done.  – http://takedownpiracy.com/stats/
  • According to Google’s Transparency Report, TDP is #1 for the past month in reporting copyright infringements.  Can a small business compete with giant companies like Microsoft and NBC Universal?  TDP is proof that you can.  And the best part, is we can do it for a fraction of the cost.  Anti-piracy should never cost you more than you’re losing to piracy.  This is a core value of our company.  http://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/copyright/
  • Lots of upcoming news regarding TDP founder Nate Glass speaking at the upcoming CatalystCon as well as some cool interviews we’ve done in the past few days.

Big shout-outs to the excellent work being done by Robert King.  Check out his work at http://www.stopfilelockers.com/

As a man-on-a-mission, Mr. King has nearly single-handedly devastated the ability for piracy havens to process money through their services.  To all the naysayers claiming one person can’t make a difference, I submit Robert King.  Now of course the naysayers will never stop being naysayers, they’ll just keep moving the goal posts back until they’ve set the goal as unrealistic as possible.  This makes them feel vindicated when people don’t meet their insane requirements.  The key is to not take your eyes off the prize.  The naysayers and freeloaders love to try and set your goals for you, you simply must ignore them and work towards your own goals.

The engine of accomplishment runs on the fuel of naysayers.

You can quote me on that.

 

-Nate

Takedown Piracy celebrates three year anniversary

CHATSWORTH, Calif. — Takedown Piracy is proud to celebrate its 3-year anniversary combatting piracy.  Created by Nate Glass in 2009, Takedown Piracy is known for its highly effective and affordable services, while always operating with the utmost integrity.  Whether harnessing the power of its one-of-a-kind Aikido Program or following up on an individual file reported through its free piracy tip page, Takedown Piracy has been responsible for the removal of over 6.5 million copyright infringements.

For more information about Takedown Piracy, visit HERE.

During its 3-years, Takedown Piracy has made customer service a priority.  Clients are continually provided with detailed reports on all removed copyright infringements, while having the ability to contact Takedown Piracy 16 hours a day.  As a result, Takedown Piracy has an exemplary retention rate.

A client of Takedown Piracy for 2 years, pro wrestler Colt Cabana states, “I’m forever indebted to Takedown Piracy!  Only 3 days after I put out my completely independent movie, word was out it had hit the torrent sites, YouTube, and more.  After funding the whole project myself, this was a scary thought.  This is when Takedown Piracy came in and saved the day (and maybe my life).  Weeks later I had known Internet pirates telling me they couldn’t find my movie anywhere—it was such a great feeling.  I can’t speak more highly about Nate and Takedown Piracy.  They’re really helping the little guy fight the good fight.”

Indie DVD distributor Blue Underground, Inc. has been protected by Takedown Piracy for over a year.  President Willian Lustig says, “Takedown Piracy has opened my eyes to the pervasive, ugly, digital-age underbelly of Internet piracy.  I’m sure Takedown Piracy’s tenacious copyright notice campaign on behalf of Blue Underground has given some pirates pause before going through the effort of posting my company’s copyrighted properties.”

Takedown Piracy also safeguards the digital content of lesbian erotica producer Girlfriends Films.  Vice President Moose says, “It is impossible to predict how much money we would lose if pirates were allowed to steal our movies unchecked, but thanks to Takedown Piracy, we’ll never have to know.  Even as pirates find new and faster ways to upload our content, Nate and his team are right there removing it before we lose sales.  While the mainstream music and movie industries wait around for the government to intervene in matters of copyright infringement, we are taking the fight right to the pirates with Takedown Piracy.  It is the best, and we are lucky to have its protection.”

“Nate does an amazing job in his ongoing battle with removing stolen content from the internet,” adds actress and adult performer Tanya Tate.  “Without people like Nate continuously and tirelessly protecting the intellectual property of performers and companies, new entertainment would be unfeasible to create.  As a director, performer and producer, I personally want to thank Nate for his work and keeping a proactive watch on my website, TanyaTate.com.  I wholeheartedly recommend using the services of Takedown Piracy to any creator who is concerned about their content.”

Each month, Takedown Piracy’s Nate Glass educates readers of AVN Magazine and AVN.com with insightful business news and expert advice regarding digital content protection.  AVN Managing Editor Steve Javors says, “Congrats to Nate Glass and Takedown Piracy on three years of serving the industry.  It was because of Nate’s ‘boots-on-the-ground’ experience battling piracy that I wanted him to write a column for AVN.  Every month, he provides an insider’s view of the scourge of content creators everywhere.  His columns are informative and really have become a must-read.  Cheers to you, Nate, and here’s to many more years of Takedown Piracy.”

Moved by the support of his clients, Nate Glass says, “From the beginning I knew Takedown Piracy was so much more than a job.  It was a mission.  I believe every single one of my clients has the right to protect their art and content.  Pirates feel entitled to take whatever they want online, but if that mentality goes unchecked, we will see a staggering decrease in the amount of music, movies, and books created.  With the discovery and elimination of each new copyright infringement, and the destruction of torrent and cyberlocker sites, Takedown Piracy is determined to prevent that from happening.”

Takedown Piracy and Nate Glass continue to be in the media spotlight for their renowned effectiveness fighting piracy.  Featured on CNBC.com, TechDirt.com, The Daily.com, the 1709 Blog, and more, word is spreading about the small but mighty company, and its David versus Goliath story.

Wanting to better involve the fans of Takedown Piracy’s numerous artist clients, the company created a tips page.  Millions of additional eyes provide Takedown Piracy with an army seeking out illegal downloads on torrent, tube and cyberlocker sites.  Users are asked to report the copyright owner and a link to the infringement.  To report a copyright violation using Takedown Piracy’s tip page, visit http://takedownpiracy.com/tips/.

On a larger scale, Takedown Piracy’s custom infringement removal tool, the Aikido Program™, removes hundreds of thousands of copyright infringements at an incredible speed.  Aikido 2.0 magnifies the production by increasing the patrolling range of the program.  It takes sites meant to assist illegal downloads and transforms them into valuable assets in anti-piracy.  True to its martial art namesake, the Aikido Program uses the strength of its opponent to its own advantage.  Combined with Takedown Piracy’s new SEO program, Search Clean™, infringements are eliminated from even the largest search engines, like Google.

Takedown Piracy actively tracks at least nine different ways content may be pirated, providing widespread coverage.  Takedown Piracy’s army of servers offer protection in the following areas: Cyberlocker sites like Rapidshare, Torrent sites, Tube sites, Auctioned or unauthorized DVD resellers, Search Engines, Image Hosts, Blogs, Forums, Social Media.

To view a statistical breakdown of infringements removed by Takedown Piracy, visit http://takedownpiracy.com/stats/.

What can Latvia and the USSR teach us about copyright?

As I was working on scouring a piracy site today I noticed the host was in Latvia.  It’s not all that common to find piracy sites hosted in Latvia.  Admittedly the only thing I knew that came outta Latvia was Golden State Warrior Andris Biedriņš.  So I decided to look up how Latvia views copyright.  While the Latvian view of copyright has changed over the years, I did find this official Latvian government website detailing the history of Latvian copyright.

http://www.km.gov.lv/en/eu/member/copyright_history.html

Here’s a key excerpt:

“During the Soviet Union time in Latvia the Universal or Geneva Copyright Convention was in force. Nevertheless, authors had a very rare chance to control the use of their works. Usually there was no permission requested from author for use of the work, there was no private enterprises or state authority to administer the rights of authors. Even though after the WW II in Latvia functioned department of USSR Copyright organization the main opinion was that “art belongs to nations” therefore everyone could free and without any restrictions use works without paying remuneration. As USSR had not joined the Berne Convention the rights of foreign authors were not observed as well.”

So it turns out the Soviets were big on the freeloading bandwagon too.  There’s a great role model for the copyright-abolitionists of the world.

Doing a little research on what kind of economy the USSR built upon stances like this turned up this website:

http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/watkins/sovietcollapse.htm

Choice excerpts:

There were many economic problems for the Soviet Stalinist system. One very general problem was the the lack of incentives for productivity. As anonymous Soviet citizen said

They pretend to pay us and we pretend to work.

Lack of incentives for productivity.  Since the purpose of copyright is to create incentives for creators to create, I think the copyright abolitionists of the world might want to take heed.

The Russian economist, Grigory Yavlinsky, who ultimately became an important advisor to Mikhail Gorbachev, became convinced to the need for reform when he investigated the low productivity in the Soviet mines. He found the miners were not working because they had no incentives to work. Said Yavlinsky:

The Soviet system is not working because the workers are not working.

It’s a pretty simple concept.  Since the world works on a system where we have currencies, currencies that you can exchange for goods and currencies that you can acquire more of by doing more or creating more, any system that dis-incentivizes productivity is doomed to fail.

Or as Peter put it in Office Space:

It’s a problem of motivation, all right? Now if I work my ass off and Initech ships a few extra units, I don’t see another dime, so where’s the motivation?

The copyright abolitionists who feel that everyone else should provide for them are going down the same road that the Soviets went down.  It just doesn’t work.  It would be great if we could have everything provided for us, but we live in a world with a finite supply of natural resources.  If you want a world without money then you absolutely have to do one of these two things:

1.  Replace oil, and replace it entirely.  Remember that oil is used in the manufacturing of nearly everything.  It’s not just gas in your car.  It’s the plastic in your keyboard, the rubber in your tires and it’s probably a key ingredient in the McRib.  And you must replace it with an energy source that costs absolutely nothing to produce, harness, distribute and implement.  There can be absolutely no cost involved.  Or…

2.  Convince the oil-rich countries to just give it to us for free.  Which will never happen.  And even if it does, we’d be so gluttonous with it that we’d be out of oil by the middle of next week.  If it didn’t cost anything to gas up you might as well drive a Sandcrawler.  I hear Hummer is working on it.

So for the “culture should be free” crowd who, not surprisingly, seem to advocate for the nanny state, I ask thee:  If all of the services and entertainment should be provided to you by the state, who’s tax dollars are funding this?  If there is no incentive to work or produce, how do you fund your little Utopia?  Do you really want your economy hinging on a bunch of Peter Gibbons’?  Ask the USSR how that worked out while they were getting their ass kicked by the capitalist swine of America.

Copyright infringers think this defense will hold up in court

I would say this is only slightly better than the Chewbacca defense and not nearly as good as pleading insanity.

Also, while I have airbrushed out the name of the site you should know a few things:

1.  This site is purely FOR PROFIT.

2.  This site created different sections for the works of different copyright holders.  Something tells me you can’t claim you don’t know what’s going on on your site when you have different sections for specific companies.

3.  This site does not comply with DMCA notices.

4.  This site is not “user uploaded content”.  The only people able to post on this site are the site owners themselves.  You can’t claim ignorance or the “we just index content” when you decide what content is indexed because you’re the one that uploaded it.

5.  Despite being clear cut criminals, there will be a hoard of freeloaders commenting here to defend these actions.

Takedown Piracy Featured as Supporter of The Artists’ Bill of Rights Campaign

Takedown Piracy is featured as a supporter of the Artists’ Bill of Rights campaign.  The campaign was established to promote a set of ethical principles concerning the use of artists’ intellectual property rights in competitions and appeals seeking use of creative content.  An insightful interview with Takedown Piracy owner Nate Glass recently posted on Artists-Bill-of-Rights.org.  The interview spotlights the company’s crusade against digital content theft.

To view Takedown Piracy’s inclusion as a supporter of the Artists’ Bill of Rights, visit http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/about-us/supporters/takedown-piracy/.

For a list of all supporters of the Artists’ Bill of Rights, visit http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/about-us/supporters/.

To read the interview with Takedown Piracy owner Nate Glass, visit http://artists-bill-of-rights.org/news/campaign-news/an-interview-with-takedown-piracy%27s-ceo/.

Artists’ Bill of Rights Campaign Manager Gordon Harrison states, “Artists’ Bill of Rights is a campaigning organization promoting respect for the rights of artists; we are delighted to promote the Takedown Piracy service founded by Nate Glass.  The work it is doing to defend its clients from the scourge of piracy is vital.  We are particularly impressed in Takedown Piracy’s use of the power of technology to protect its clients, such as its Aikido program, which discovers pirated copies of clients’ works and issue takedown notices to the sites hosting them.  We wish them continued success in this important task.”

“Everything we do is about protecting people’s artistic property,” says Nate Glass.  “The Artists’ Bill of Rights campaign has the same goals.  They work to achieve a stop to piracy through education of the masses, while we try to stop piracy at the source.  By supporting each other, we are able to cover all our bases and greatly reduce digital content theft.”

Takedown Piracy and Nate Glass continue to be in the media spotlight for their renowned effectiveness combatting piracy.  Featured on CNBC.com, TechDirt.com, TheDaily.com, the 1709 Blog, and more, word is spreading about the small but mighty company, and its David versus Goliath story.

Each month, Nate Glass educates readers of AVN Magazine and AVN.com with insightful business news regarding digital content protection for the adult industry to absorb and learn from.  Through humor and accessible rhetoric, Glass explores issues every owner of digital content should know.  To read Glass’ most recent article, visit http://www.thedigitaleditiononline.com/publication/?i=93457&p=54.

With consumers becoming better educated on the harms of piracy, Glass created the Takedown Piracy Tips Page, so people can help make a difference.  Millions of additional eyes provide Takedown Piracy with an army seeking out illegal downloads on torrent, tube and cyberlocker sites.  Users are asked to report the copyright owner and a link to the infringement.  To report a copyright violation using Takedown Piracy’s tip page, visit http://takedownpiracy.com/tips/.

Takedown Piracy actively tracks at least nine different ways content may be pirated, providing widespread coverage.  Takedown Piracy’s army of servers offer protection in the following areas: Cyberlocker sites like Rapidshare, Torrent sites, Tube sites, Auctioned or unauthorized DVD resellers, Search Engines, Image Hosts, Blogs, Forums, Social Media.

To view a statistical breakdown of infringements removed by Takedown Piracy, visit http://takedownpiracy.com/stats/.

 About the Artists’ Bill of Rights:

The Artists’ Bill of Rights campaign was originally founded in 2008 by a photographers organization, Pro-Imaging.  The campaign was established to promote a set of ethical principles concerning the use of artists’ intellectual property rights in competitions and appeals seeking use of creative content.  The campaign seeks to persuade organizations from all sectors, private, charitable, public and non-profit to adopt these principles, and in return it promotes its supporters.  The Artists’ Bill of Rights is encouraged to have gained considerable support for this campaign from organizations across the globe. For further information, please visit the Artists’ Bill of Rights website at http://artists-bill-of-rights.org.

 About Takedown Piracy:

Takedown Piracy (TDP) is an anti-piracy service started in April of 2009.  The service was founded by 14-year entertainment industry veteran Nate Glass.  TDP offers copyright holders an affordable and highly effective means to fight back against content thieves.  For less than the cost of a part-time, minimum wage worker, copyright holders can benefit from Glass’ expertise and passion for protecting copyrighted content from thieves.  To date, TDP has removed over 6.3 million content infringements.  Leading piracy websites are closely monitored to always provide clients with immediate service and protection.  Every month detailed reports are provided to clients with each action taken on their behalf.  A price can’t be placed on trust, but with Takedown Piracy, clients can be sure the company has their best interest in mind 100% of the time.  For more information, visit www.TakedownPiracy.com or www.Twitter.com/TakedownPiracy.